Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine - Gail Honeyman



Genre: Contemporary Fiction
Release Date: 9th May 2017

Started Reading: 30/01/2018
Finished Reading: 04/02/2018
'In the end, what matters is this: I survived.'
Eleanor Oliphant is odd. She speaks like an 80-year-old woman even though she's only 30, leads a monotonous life and keeps herself to herself. No friends, no family (other than her mother), and no fun.

I got this book because it's one of those ones that almost everyone is talking about. A lot of the time, I don't actually like the really popular books, but this one was definitely worth it. It's funny, mysterious and weird, and such a great read.

The novel follows the changes in Eleanor as she makes her first friend - Raymond, an IT Crowd worthy hilarious character who warms her heart and completely changes her personality.

I loved this because it was so different. I've got to admit, I couldn't stand Eleanor when I first started reading it because I felt she was stuck up and found the whole 'mummy' thing creepy, but everything I disliked was explained later in the plot. She also became more likeable as she got closer to Raymond.

There are also multiple little twists throughout the book which kept me gripped the whole way through. It's been a while since I read a book that had so many unexpected twists and turns in the plot.

It did remind me a lot of a more serious episode of the IT Crowd. Eleanor reminds me of Jen when she's trying to be formal and Raymond is a definite cross of Roy and Moss. The serious turns, later on, take it away from this idea.

I also don't think I've ever read a novel with an alcoholic main character, either. I feel like it makes Eleanor's straight-talking narration more unreliable and some parts vague to their meaning.

It's definitely worth the hype and worth a read.

'Sometimes you simply needed someone kind to sit with you while you dealt with things.'

Want to read it?

Buy it in the UK here and the US here.

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